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Topic: Big sail

Is a 10 meter sail practical for my sup board on really light wind days?  I have a chance at a used one but don't know if it would be too much sail.  This is just light wind sailing on flat water.

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Re: Big sail

A big sail is not fun on a SUP since SUPs don't plane.  I use a 6.2 on my SUP in about 8-12 mph because I am a big guy, but most people I have seen sailing SUPs seem to use 5.5-5.8 on their SUPs.  I have managed to get my SUP to plane a few times but it wasn't worth the effort.

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Re: Big sail

Thanks for the response.  That is what I needed to here.

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Re: Big sail

I am still waiting for the Psychofreak, which was to be the definitive answer to this question...

Or, baring that, at least the HSM version of the WOD sail (in colorful ultralight with the usual bomber construction)

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Re: Big sail

A big sail is not fun on a SUP since Sups don't plane.

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Re: Big sail

Well, I agree with these sentiments but think it's slightly more complicated because there are lots of longboards these days and sometimes "SUP" gets used as a substitute for "longboard".

Big sails (>7.5) are best suited to:
1) Wide super-planing shortboards, Formula boards, etc., and
2) Performance-oriented longboards (i.e., raceboards).

There are some planing surf-sailing boards, such as the Exocet Curve, and one can put a big sail on them to make them plane (I've done it to see what happens). If that were all you had to go planing on a light wind day you could live with it, but it's not what I'd call great riding. This style of board is most fun to drive in the surf, somewhat back and forth at the gliding/planing threshold, especially using waves for a boost to planing. But typically that style of riding is best in 7.0 and down (not 7.5 and up). For the most part, my experience (I'm not a good paddle-surfer and got rid of my paddle as I find it dull) is that these boards are tricky to paddle as they have outlines optimized for surf-sailing (narrower, thinner and rounded tails). The main function of these style boards is surf-sailing in areas with light winds and mushy waves, not SUP work.

I agree that most pure SUP's don't plane very well, but Fanatic's line of SUP's actually sail pretty well (I've used the Fly) and are better in the SUP mode than the Exocet Curve (my opinion). Some of them could carry bigger sail (maybe not a 10.0) and plane in light winds. Still, I'm with the others and think you'll have a better time with a sail in the 5.0-6.5 range, erring on the smaller side and only going larger if you are big or have somewhat more powerful shore break with light onshore winds where you need a little more oomph to get out.

I have an 8.0 Super Freak and have used it with the Exocet (mine is a Kona 11'5) and that's OK, but the 8.0 SF is better suited to wide floaty waveboards and ~7.5 planing conditions than the Kona/Exocet. My fave sail for the Kona 11'5 is a 6.3 SF.

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Re: Big sail

I plane on my Amundson 11'3 SUP all the time. I planed on a 10'6 Naish SUP at Silver Sands in Barbados, under wave plus sail power.  Planed a 11'6 Amundson SUP. And on a 10'6 Fanatic Fly SUP. Clearly, some SUPs plane. They don't skip across the water and chop hop like the 11'5 Exocet curve, but they plane. I have found them more fun, just as fast, and easier to gybe than the exocet curve in similar conditions. I have seen multiple posts by nyocean remarking on his mistral Pacifico SUP planing. I have a 9.0 aerotech zenith, my largest sail, and it works better on my Exocet curve than on the Amundson. My 7.0 superfreak works extremely well on the 11'3 Amundson SUP. I have never tried a 10.0 sail on a SUP, but a 11.0 aerotech works well on a Kona one.....

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Re: Big sail

First I personally think that the post #5 is a spam/bait post as it is an exact copy of a phrase in post #2...

But any way a few comments smile
It is correctly that SUP boards are not meant to plane - boards like the Exocet is foremost made as a windsurfer that can be used as a SUP, the same goes for the Mistral Pacific.

And it is important to separate the long SUP's (10'+) from the short (sub 10') as the rocker is more "extreme" the shorter the boards and therefore less able to plane. (We are here only talking allround/wave SUP's)
A board that can do both will always be a compromise, as if it need to excel in the waves it will not be good to plane and vice versa.

Personally I'm putting a track in my 9'3 SUP to have the option of putting a sail on it instead of either sitting on the beach or strugling with the paddle (as SUP in winds over 7-8m/s is a true hassle)
- And even then a narrower board would be better suited to light wind wave riding (like a 'converted' 9-10 foot regular longboard)

Putting a sail on a SUP is quite an easy way to ride waves and can be pretty fun and can/will hone your skills for another day smile

But I agree that a sail in the 5-6m2 (and up to 7ish) range is most suitable for SUP sailing
And keep the 7.5+ sails for the raceboards/large slalom boards....

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Re: Big sail

I agree, Todd. Your post and mine with Surfingsen shows why it's not so simple as SUP's aren't fun with a big sail. They can be. I also agree that newer designs ride a bit better than my Kona 11'5 (Exocet Curve), but when I got it there wasn't much better. We're seeing quite a bit of evolution in sailable SUP's. I really like the Fanatic Fly, great board for all kinds of stuff (and it planes easily, too).

Years back I got a Mistral Pacifico Wave (more of a wave longboard than the Pacifico) and I can get it to plane...but it flexes and wobbles underfoot such that I prolonged such use would risk breaking it so I stopped doing that. It's really a light wind surf sailer, OK, but newer boards are much better. That's why I left it at my friend's house near the beach, rather than keep it at home (or sell). It's better than nothing, and it's paid for!!

I also agree with Surfingsen that adding a mast track is not hard to do, dramatically adds to the versatility of an SUP, and can help improve surfing skills on light wind days (not to mention minimize the risk of getting skunked if you mainly want to sail).

Those who know my posts will know that I have big light wind planing gear and a course raceboard, but I should think one very attractive sail/board quiver is a sailable SUP and marginal floater shortboard (of whatever flavor one prefers) with a sail quiver that has nothing bigger than a 6.0-6.5.  If you wanted that quiver to be limited to 2 boards, I would advise a versatile, maybe FSW, type of shortboard more to the sinker side and 58-59 cm wide (a real sweet spot in board/sea interaction in 5.0-6.0 wind). Bigger sailors may need a bit more width and sail size. If you can do 3+ boards, then a shortboard that just floats you (racey, freestyle, wave or FSW) and higher wind board are great mates to an SUP. This is where a 7.0 SF comes in really handy, since it gives the middle board a couple of sail sizes that work. It also can offer a little extra power on SUP days that need it (noting the most sail-surfing is done in the 5.0-6.3 range).

Either mix of boards is a nice quiver, and if you want to get a big sail you can throw it on the SUP when it's enough to plane and use a small sail when you can't plane. I still favor the big sails on performance boards rather than SUPs, but for a minimalist quiver the right SUP will plane and I would be surprised if the rider didn't have a smile at the end of the day!  smile

Last edited by Geoff (2013-03-16 05:57:45)

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Re: Big sail

Very good clarifications Surfingsen. Compromises in either direction. I have the 11'8 Exocet windSUP which has full mast track and a planing undersurface. It windsurfs great but doesn't SUPsurf waves nearly as well as my starboard whopper. And the whopper doesn't windsurf nearly as well as the Exocet. The Amundson 11'3 SUP windsurfs and planes well because it has a pretty flat rocker, like the Mistral Pacifico SUP. And like I've observed, and nyocean has posted about his Pacifico SUP,  these boards don't SUPsurf as well as they windsurf. Interestingly regarding the starboard whopper, it of the pronounced surfing rocker and excellent surfing performance and weak windsurfing performance, I have gotten it planing;  but it took ideal wind direction, strength, and matched sail---ocean sailing, side shore winds off 15-17 knots, with a 7.0 superfreak.....

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Re: Big sail

Excellent observations and well written as usual, Geoff. I was posting while you were so I missed yours initially.....

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